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Cold War Spy Photos Show How Fast Himalayan Glaciers Are Melting
By turning declassified images into a 3D model, scientists find that the mountain range's glaciers are melting twice as fast as before 2000.
18 hours ago
Wired Science
Cold War Spy Photos Show How Fast Himalayan Glaciers Are Melting
This Robot Fish Powers Itself With Fake Blood
A new robot lionfish uses a rudimentary vasculature and "blood" to both energize itself and hydraulically power its fins.
19 hours ago
Wired Science
This Robot Fish Powers Itself With Fake Blood
Hospitals Aren't Ready for a Mass Casualty Wildfire
With wildfires intensifying, the number of burn victims is likely to rise. But hospitals have been losing their burn treatment expertise, leaving the country unprepared.
1 day ago
Wired Science
Hospitals Aren't Ready for a Mass Casualty Wildfire
Weather Forecasts Will Soon Use Weird, Bendy GPS Signals
SpaceX will soon launch weather-prediction satellites that track how GPS signals bend as they travel through the atmosphere.
1 day ago
Wired Science
Weather Forecasts Will Soon Use Weird, Bendy GPS Signals
The Midwest's Farms Face an Intense, Crop-Killing Future
The flooding that struck the Midwest is just one way climate change is causing plants to fail, complicating life for the region's growers.
1 day ago
Wired Science
The Midwest's Farms Face an Intense, Crop-Killing Future
What Adam Savage Needs to Know to Fly an Iron Man Suit
In the first episode of Savage Builds, Adam Savage tries to build and control an Iron Man flying suit. But he didn't quite figure out the controls.
2 days ago
Wired Science
What Adam Savage Needs to Know to Fly an Iron Man Suit
The Prickly Debate on Germline Gene Therapy, and Moving It Forward
In 2016, a healthy baby boy came screaming into the world in a Mexican clinic. Harboring DNA from three parents, the baby had had his genes dramatically altered while still an embryo. Without the treatment, an inheritable neurological disorder would've killed him before the age of three. Two years later ...
22 hours ago
SingularityHUB
The Prickly Debate on Germline Gene Therapy, and Moving It Forward
Inching Towards Abundant Water: New Progress in Desalination Tech
In early 2018, Cape Town, South Africa came dangerously close to being the world's first major city to run out of water. People lined up for blocks to collect spring water. Stores sold out of receptacles like buckets and bowls. Bottled water was rationed in tourist-heavy parts of the city. April 12 was ...
1 day ago
SingularityHUB
Inching Towards Abundant Water: New Progress in Desalination Tech
The Rise of AI Art?and What It Means for Human Creativity
Artificially intelligent systems are slowly taking over tasks previously done by humans, and many processes involving repetitive, simple movements have already been fully automated. In the meantime, humans continue to be superior when it comes to abstract and creative tasks. However, it seems like even ...
2 days ago
SingularityHUB
The Rise of AI Art?and What It Means for Human Creativity
The return of the wolf: Wild cubs born in the Netherlands
Authorities say wolves are officially back in the Netherlands, two centuries after the animals were hunted to extinction in the country, after a pair produced a litter in the wild. The province of Gelderland posted a video online showing three young wolves in a forest clearing. Van der Weide said Thursday ...
24 minutes ago
Yahoo Science
The return of the wolf: Wild cubs born in the Netherlands
Poll: Tracking asteroids a favored focus for space program
Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, released Thursday, ...
1 hour ago
Yahoo Science
Poll: Tracking asteroids a favored focus for space program
Einstein's relativity document gifted to Nobel museum
The Nobel Museum in Stockholm has been gifted Albert Einstein's first paper published after he received the Nobel Prize in 1922 and discussing his then still controversial relativity theory. The paper, written in November 1922 while Einstein was attending conferences in south-east Asia, was published ...
1 hour ago
Yahoo Science
Einstein's relativity document gifted to Nobel museum
Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson's in brain
Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson's disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a discovery that could eventually lead to better screening for at-risk people. Parkinson's, a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and cognitive ...
1 hour ago
Yahoo Science
Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson's in brain
Russia to release 100 illegally captured whales
Russian officials have launched an operation to release nearly 100 illegally captured whales whose confinement in Russia's far east has become a rallying cry for environmentalists. A state TV reporter made the announcement during President Vladimir Putin's live Q&A show on Thursday, saying that by "coincidence" ...
1 hour ago
Yahoo Science
Russia to release 100 illegally captured whales
In a lost city buried by jungle, scientists found these creatures thriving
There were once rumors of a mythological Ciudad Blanca, or "White City," laying hidden in the Central American jungle, overgrown with moss and trees. Then, to international intrigue, an aerial expedition found the settlement of legend in 2012 ' and later its ancient bowls, stone sculptures, ...
1 hour ago
Yahoo Science
In a lost city buried by jungle, scientists found these creatures thriving
Dangerous brain parasite 'orders in' for dinner
Researchers have discovered how toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite, maintains a steady supply of nutrients while replicating inside of its host cell: it calls for delivery.
15 hours ago
Science Daily
Dangerous brain parasite 'orders in' for dinner
Importance of climate on spruce beetle flight
If the climate continues warming as predicted, spruce beetle outbreaks in the Rocky Mountains could become more frequent.
15 hours ago
Science Daily
Importance of climate on spruce beetle flight
High reaction rates even without precious metals
Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder ...
18 hours ago
Science Daily
High reaction rates even without precious metals
Astronomers uncover first polarized radio signals from gamma-ray burst
An international team of astronomers has captured the first-ever polarized radio waves from a distant cosmic explosion.
18 hours ago
Science Daily
Astronomers uncover first polarized radio signals from gamma-ray burst
Early Celts in Burgundy appropriated Mediterranean products and feasting practices
Early Celts in eastern France imported Mediterranean pottery, as well as olive oil and wine, and may have appropriated Mediterranean feasting practices, according to a new study.
18 hours ago
Science Daily
Early Celts in Burgundy appropriated Mediterranean products and feasting practices
A miniature robot that could check colons for early signs of disease
Engineers have shown it is technically possible to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take micro-ultrasound images. Known as a Sonopill, the device could one day replace the need for patients to undergo an endoscopic examination, where a semi-rigid scope is passed into the bowel - an invasive ...
18 hours ago
Science Daily
A miniature robot that could check colons for early signs of disease
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
Shipworms are known for boring into wood and digesting it, but scientists found a new species with a very different diet.
1 day ago
New York Times Science
This Creature Eats Stone. Sand Comes Out the Other End.
How an Arctic Hyena Was Found in Canada, Then Lost, Then Found Again
The discovery illustrates how museum collections may be filled with forgotten fossils that could expand knowledge of prehistory.
20 hours ago
New York Times Science
How an Arctic Hyena Was Found in Canada, Then Lost, Then Found Again
Watch Soap Bubbles Turn Into Tiny Snow Globes as They Freeze
The freeze front creates an unusual liquid flow on the surface of the soap bubbles, new research suggests.
1 day ago
New York Times Science
Watch Soap Bubbles Turn Into Tiny Snow Globes as They Freeze
Cuttlefish Arms Are Not So Different From Yours
Cephalopods, flies and even humans share genes needed to develop limbs, perhaps provided by a common ancestor.
1 day ago
New York Times Science
Cuttlefish Arms Are Not So Different From Yours
Those Puppy Dog Eyes You Can't Resist? Thank Evolution
Dogs have a muscle that lets them make a face to melt a human's heart.
1 day ago
New York Times Science
Those Puppy Dog Eyes You Can't Resist? Thank Evolution
Grow Faster, Grow Stronger: Speed-Breeding Crops to Feed the Future
Plant breeders are fast-tracking genetic improvements in food crops to keep pace with global warming and a growing human population.
2 days ago
New York Times Science
Grow Faster, Grow Stronger: Speed-Breeding Crops to Feed the Future
California Institute of Technology Commencement
More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/speeches/cordova/19/fc190614_caltechcommencement.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_51 This is an NSF News item.
1 day ago
National Science Foundation
California Institute of Technology Commencement
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